Brewing up bone broth

by Keith Nunes
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LonoLife broth - chicken bone broth, cream of mushroom broth, veggie broth, paleo
LonoLife offers five products, two bone broths, beef and chicken, and three other varieties that are less traditional, including chicken, mushroom and vegetable varieties.

SAN FRANCISCO — As the market for bone broth has heated up, manufacturers have been working to take the concept from food service to retail. At the Winter Fancy Foods Show in San Francisco, LonoLife, San Diego, was exhibiting a single-serve format that may be used within the Keurig Green Mountain system.

LonoLife may be considered version 2.0 of the company. It initially launched under another brand, but quickly shifted gears, said Brian Hoppe, national sales director.

“We had a product, but didn’t understand who would like it,” he said Jan. 17 during the Winter Fancy Food Show. “Then we realized the Paleo community was very strong, very vocal and we were quick to adapt.”

Working with the San Diego Coffee Co., the companies were able to develop the K-cup application. Mr. Hoppe added that what makes LonoLife’s concept different is the K-cup pod they use is 100 percent recyclable.

“We felt that was an important feature,” he said.

Traditional bone broths are made from roasted animal bones that are simmered for extended periods, from about 12 to 48 hours, with the goal of extracting the nutrients, minerals, gelatin, collagen and amino acids. What once was considered just a base for stews, soups and gravies has become a beverage that is perceived to be very nutritious.

LonoLife offers five products, two bone broths, beef and chicken, and three other varieties that are less traditional, including chicken, mushroom and vegetable varieties. The chicken broth is sourced from chicken stock, the mushroom concept is made with the white button variety, and the vegetable broth features a “cornucopia of fresh vegetables,” according to the company.

This past September, the Campbell Soup Co. launched a soup concept that may be brewed in Keurig Hot brewers. Hoppe credits the company with demonstrating to consumers that the Keurig may be used for more than just coffee.

“That really showed us this can work,” Hoppe said. “Bone broths are a perfect fit and they are on trend as people look for products high in protein that are nutritious.”

The product is marketed as being natural, but Hoppe said they are working to get it certified as organic. E-commerce is LonoLife’s key sales channel at the moment, but like many other companies at the Winter Fancy Food Show, they are seeking to grow its distribution to specialty and mainstream retailers.

“It’s an education process,” Hoppe said. “We realize this is different and that’s why we are here (at the show). To show people what this is and how good it is.”

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