Income vs. intake

by Jeff Gelski
Share This:
Search for similar articles by keyword: [Consumers], [Weight Management]
IFIC study
“What’s Your Health Worth?”, the International Food Information Council Foundation’s 10th anniversary food and health survey was released on May 12.

WASHINGTON – Americans want to lose weight and eat healthier, but they also understand processed foods bring several benefits, according to “What’s Your Health Worth?” the International Food Information Council Foundation’s 10th anniversary food and health survey released May 12. In another survey finding, Americans may not be as healthy as they think they are.

This year’s survey focused on trade-offs Americans make regarding health and nutrition.

If they were given an additional $100 a month, people were asked to choose three ways they would spend the money. Sixty-one percent said they would save, invest or pay off debts, while 28 percent would pay for household expenses or home repairs, 23 percent would spend more on travel, 17 percent would shop for anything other than groceries, 13 percent would spend more on entertainment, 13 percent would spend more on groceries, 10 percent would spend more to dine out, and 9 percent would spend the money on a gym membership or athletic activities.

IFIC graphic
If given an extra $100 every month, no more than 13% would apply the extra money to any of the food or health options.

People in households earning $35,000 to $47,000 per year were more likely, at 18 percent, to spend more on groceries if given an additional $100 a month than people in households earning less than $35,000, at 16 percent, and people in households earning more than $75,0000, at 7 percent. People in households earning less than $35,000 a year were more likely, at 12 percent, to spend more on dining out if given an additional $100 a month than people in households earning $35,000 to $47,000 per year, at 10 percent, and people in households earning more than $75,000 per year, at 9 percent.

IFIC weight graphic
When given a choice between losing money or gaining weight, women would rather lose the money. Men are evenly split.

The survey again this year asked consumers if they would rather lose $1,000 or gain 20 lbs. This year 56 percent said they would rather lose the money, which was the same percentage as last year. Women, at 61 percent, were more likely than men, at 50 percent, to say they would rather lose $1,000. People of the ages 65 to 80, at 63 percent, were more likely than those 50 to 64, at 60 percent, 35 to 49, at 57 percent, and 18 to 34, at 48 percent, to say they would rather lose $1,000.

IFIC processed foods graphic
Half of Americans believe that they would be most impacted by a higher cost of food if processed foods were removed from the food supply.

The survey asked people the four most important ways they would be impacted if processed foods were removed from the food supply. The top three answers were higher cost of food (51 percent), less convenient (45 percent) and improved health/nutrition (43 percent). Older people and college graduates were more likely to select “less convenient.” Younger people and people with higher incomes were more likely to select “improved health/nutrition.” Lower-income Americans were most concerned about cost impacts if processed foods were removed from the food supply.

Comment on this Article
We welcome your thoughtful comments. Please comply with our Community rules.

 

 


The views expressed in the comments section of Meat and Poultry News do not reflect those of Meat and Poultry News or its parent company, Sosland Publishing Co., Kansas City, Mo. Concern regarding a specific comment may be registered with the Editor by clicking the Report Abuse link.