Bar-S Foods recalls RTE product for possible Listeria contamination

by MEAT+POULTRY Staff
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WASHINGTON – The US Dept. of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) on July 19 announced a recall of approximately 372,684 lbs. of  ready-to-eat products from Altus, Oklahoma-based Bar-S Foods Company. The chicken and pork hot dog and corn dog products that are being recalled may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

The RTE chicken and pork hot dog and corn dog items, which were shipping to retail locations nationwide, were produced on July 10, 11, 12, and 13, 2016.

Bar-S Foods notified FSIS’ Dallas District Office on July 19 of its plan to recall five chicken and pork hot dog and corn dog products that they found could potentially be contaminated with L. monocytogenes. Test results for Listeria in connection with the products are not in yet, but because of past Listeria issues at the company, Bar-S has decided to remove the products from the market to be safe. FSIS reports that there have been no confirmed reports of illnesses or adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.

The following products are subject to recall:

• 16-oz. packages of “BAR-S Classic BUN LENGTH Franks MADE WITH CHICKEN, PORK ADDED” with “Use By” date of 10/11/2016 and case code 209.

• 12-oz. packages of “BAR-S CLASSIC Franks MADE WITH CHICKEN, PORK ADDED” with package code 6338, “Use By” date of 10/10/2016 and case code 6405.

• 24-oz. cartons of “SIGNATURE Pick 5 CORNDOGS – 8 Honey Batter Dipped Franks On A Stick” with a “Use By” date of 4/6/2017 and case code 6071.

• 42.72-oz. cartons of “BAR-S CLASSIC CORN DOGS – 16 Honey Batter Dipped Franks On A Stick” with “Use By” dates of 4/7/2017 and 4/8/2017 and case code 6396.

• 48-oz. cartons of “BAR-S CLASSIC CORN DOGS – 16 Honey Batter Dipped Franks On A Stick” with package code 14054, “Use By” dates of 4/6/2017 and 4/9/2017, and case code 14038.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. P-81A” inside the USDA mark of inspection.

According to USDA, consumption of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, people with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns.

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READER COMMENTS (5)

By JAMES JORDAN 9/15/2017 8:04:21 AM
WENT TO MAKE A BAR-S BOLOGNA SANDWICH LAST NIGHT,, EXP DATE WAS SEPT 27,, YESTERDAY WAS THE 14TH, TOOK ONE BITE THE SMELL ABOUT KILLED MY NOSE ,, THREW IT OUT, BUT DID SWALLOW A BITE,, WHEN CAN I EXPECT MY EXPIRATION ? WITH THE LYSTERIA WHATEVER IN IT ?

By Sam 8/7/2016 12:04:03 PM
Hi, I just purchase a package of Bar-s chicken and pork bologna at a Dollar-Tree on 8/4/2016. Got home and THAN remembered the recall on the hot dogs. The bologna package is marked P-81A, which is the recall lot. How is the bologna not on the list? In the garbage it goes.

By Martin Ziegler 7/23/2016 5:57:50 AM
Just wondering who will correct the mistake in this article. If the product was found to be contaminated in July how come the FSIS issued a recall notice in June.

By Martin Ziegler 7/23/2016 5:57:46 AM
Just wondering who will correct the mistake in this article. If the product was found to be contaminated in July how come the FSIS issued a recall notice in June.

By Stephen Hufford 7/20/2016 10:51:49 AM
I understand Bar S's logic but it seems flawed to me. They did and should have had concern about many presumptive listeria species results.That I fully agree with in this matter. However....they should have had a plan prior to these results. I would have made a plan to determine what we would do prior to any more finds of listeria species. If we had additional finds I would have then planned to hold next lot of product produced on the line(s) where the problem was occurring. Do a hold and test procedure. If the held product then tested positive for species, have the lab extend the test and see if it was positive for LM. In this manner you can determine if the listeria you are finding is harmful like LM. This keeps you from having to perform a recall as the product will not enter commerce. It also lets you know if you have a sanitation issue and if corrective actions need to be performed. On an economic note it keeps you from having the cost of the recall and the loss of business due to the bad publicity. Just a few thoughts from an old meat guy who has been in quality and food safety for over 34 years.