Bacon meets seaweed

by MEAT+POULTRY Staff
Share This:
Search for similar articles by keyword: [Bacon]
Jason Ball, a research chef at the Food Innovation Center in Portland, prepares dishes made with dulse to be taste-tested by the general public. (Photo by Stephen Ward.)
Jason Ball, a research chef at the Food Innovation Center in Portland, Ore., prepares dishes made with dulse to be taste-tested by the general public. (Photo by Stephen Ward.)

Bacon lovers the world over need to send scientists from Oregon State Univ. a thank you note – they’ve done the impossible. They have found a way to create a food that has the nutritional profile of kale but tastes like bacon.

Dulse is a form of seaweed that looks like red lettuce and is loaded with protein and minerals. It's commonly sold pulverized as a supplement and salt alternative. But scientists from Oregon State Univ. have developed a new strain of it that can be eaten whole. And when that newly formulated seaweed is fried up, it reportedly tastes like bacon.

Dulse is already on the menu at some New York City restaurants, like French Louie, which incorporates it into butter, and Pure Food and Wine, which uses it atop salads. But this new bacon seaweed product isn’t commercially available yet.

Chief researcher Chris Langdon and his team are working with the Oregon Dept. of Agriculture and the university's Food Innovation Center to get this newly formulated seaweed from sea to skillet.

If they're successful, this could be "a new industry for Oregon," OSU business professor Chuck Toombs said.

Comment on this Article
We welcome your thoughtful comments. Please comply with our Community rules.

 

 


The views expressed in the comments section of Meat and Poultry News do not reflect those of Meat and Poultry News or its parent company, Sosland Publishing Co., Kansas City, Mo. Concern regarding a specific comment may be registered with the Editor by clicking the Report Abuse link.